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Today we are featuring one of this year’s NCE Symposium speakers, Dr. Stephanie Chasteen, a physicist and reviewer of college-level STEM projects. Dr. Chasteen has more than fifteen years of experience in the fields of education and evaluation, including the publication of numerous books, journal articles, and multiple consulting projects. At Symposium, Dr. Chasteen will be explaining...

Today we would like to feature one of the speakers at this year’s Symposium 2021: Dr. Owen Anderson, professor of philosophy and religious studies at Arizona State University.   Dr. Anderson has published seven books and teaches courses in philosophy, philosophy of religion, ethics, and religion.  At Symposium, Dr. Anderson will be explicating some of the historical trends of science. Using the methods of Charles Lyell, Anderson will show that scientific origin stories reflect the philosophical assumptions of...

Note: The following entry is from Dr. Owen Anderson (Arizona State University), a Fellow of the Institute for Classical Education We are divided.  A house divided against itself cannot stand.  These divisions speak to a lack of foundation.  We need a foundation.  We have been provided with one but it has not been sufficiently developed.  I...

In just six weeks, we will be hearing from Dr. Stuart Newfeld, professor and renowned molecular biologist, whose ASU lab provides cutting-edge research on cancer. Dr. Newfeld has contributed to scores of publications in the most prestigious science journals in the world--including Cell, Genetics, and proceedings from the National Academy of Sciences. His collaborative research projects...

Note: The following blog entry comes to us from our colleague and friend, Betsy K. Brown, who teaches and chairs the humanities program at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, Arizona. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, with a focus on creative nonfiction, Betsy loves to share the goodness of words...

I recently revisited T. S. Eliot’s ​“Little Gidding”​and found it to be an encouragement for our times, uncertain as they are for the uncertain relationship we have with our past. Perhaps this meditation will offer some light and hope. Note this remarkable line, which, on the surface, is fraught with the highest human stakes: A people without...

Anyone well-versed on the Roman Catholic Church knows that, like every human endeavor, its history is marred by acts of hubris. In the 1630’s, one of the Church’s most flawed judgments may have been the decision to put Galileo Galilei, arguably the father of modern science, under house arrest following an Inquisition. That incident is spotlighted...

Can an individual change history? Yes. In fact, only individuals change history. History is not made up of groups, but of individual people. Similarly, wars are not won by armies, but by individuals. Social movements are not carried out by crowds, but by individuals. Technological breakthroughs are not brought about by companies, but by individuals. ...

On this anniversary of the ratification of the Bill of Rights (December 15, 1791), we have reason to celebrate those first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution, which have served as guarantees of every American’s civil liberties—including freedoms of religion, the press, peaceable assembly, petitioning the Government for redress, etc. Along with the clear articulation of...