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Reflecting upon yesterday’s national holiday, an occasion for us to commemorate the service and self-sacrifice of our veterans, I was struck by the ways in which our arts—sculpture, poetry and literature, painting, etc.—help us to capture the sentiments of society on such a day.  As you probably know, Veterans’ Day was formally initiated on the anniversary...

[Note: Benjamin V. Beier, Ph. D. is an Associate Professor of Education at Hillsdale College. He has published articles on Shakespeare, Thomas More, and related topics, and is currently co-authoring a book on Aristotelian logic.]  “Does classical education perpetuate racism, Ms. Hugh?” This question may strike the supporters of classical education as silly, but after a...

Note: The following entry is from Dr. Benjamin Storey (Furman University), a scholar and friend. He teaches the history of political philosophy and is Co-Director of the Tocqueville Program at Furman University. He has written for many journals, including Journal of Politics, the Review of Politics, The New Atlantis, and City Journal.  My children wear simple but nice uniforms to their Classical Christian School.  It is not uncommon to find their...

Seeking to better understand our contemporary moment, I’ve been looking at a variety of intellectual sources that help to make sense of our nation’s polarizing state of affairs.  Some of you have probably discovered the sociologist Jonathan Haidt (NYU), whose research and publications (e.g., The Righteous Mind, The Coddling of the American Mind) strive to explain the increasing divisions in our...

For those of you poll-watchers out there (and who’s not, at this point?!), the presidential election is a nail-biter that has yet to be decided, though I'm sure the news will continue to surge our way throughout the day. But, what can we learn about our political life from this particular election?  At times like this, I'm comforted by the Stoics...

[Note: Mr. Joshua Arbogast is an eight-year veteran teacher of the Great Hearts network, having taught in elementary and prep schools, both in Arizona and Texas. His classroom acumen is nimble enough to synchronize grade-schoolers in a Spalding phonetic chant as easily as he shepherds high schoolers through a close reading of Plato’s Republic. And,...

[Note: The following post is from our guest contributor Mr. Derek Anderson, headmaster of Ridgeview Classical in Fort Collins, Colorado. In addition to leading the school, Mr. Anderson remains an avid student of moral and political philosophy, alongside of intellectual history. His defense of the liberal arts curriculum is based upon his many years of having taught students history, philosophy, literature, and rhetoric.] Whether...

Note: this contribution is written by Jenna Storey, an accomplished scholar and a friend to the Institute. She is an Assistant Professor in Politics and International Affairs at Furman University and also Executive Director of the Tocqueville Program at Furman. She has written for many publications, including The Boston Globe, The New Atlantis, The Weekly...

A recent article on The Verge describes how a college student recently used an autoregressive language model and deep-learning to produce texts that appear to have been composed by a human. Out of 26,000 viewers of the blog only one was able to identify it as a mechanical algorithm, based on a perceived lack of substance.    One Senatorial committee...

Note: The following blog entry comes to us from our colleague and friend, Betsy K. Brown, who teaches and chairs the humanities program at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, Arizona. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, with a focus on creative nonfiction, Betsy loves to share the goodness of words...