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At last month’s Symposium, our minds were turned toward the craft and art of history--which, to our delight, has a lively element of story-telling at its center. In particular, Dr. Frederick Turner (University of Texas, Dallas) spent time with us, exploring the role and essence of historic epics.  While their mythological nature seems distant from historical reality,...

Recently re-reading Leon Kass, I was struck by the profoundly humane quality of his reasoning. As a trained physician, medical researcher, and ethicist, Kass has been involved with a number of deeply insightful projects (e.g., President’s Council on Bioethics) that promote a truly liberal understanding of the human experience, and I would argue that he...

Today we’re reviewing the first of several video conversations that took place at the National Classical Education Symposium, this past March in Phoenix. This particular conversation was with Dr. Gregory McBrayer, who directs the core curriculum at Ashland University (OH). Greg outlines the essential characteristics of a liberal education: from perennial questions to great books, and...

Rob Jackson Director, Institute for Classical Education If you find yourself with more time to observe the natural world--taking walks and hikes at sufficient social distance--you might also be interested in some careful observations surrounding the 19th century’s most famous naturalist, Charles Darwin. From David Quammen’s NYRB review of three new books on Darwin, we discover that botany...

Rob Jackson Director, Institute for Classical Education One month ago, we gathered in Phoenix for the 2nd annual National Classical Education Symposium, where we explored “The Historian’s Craft and the Art of Teaching History.” One of our informants, Dr. Wilfred McClay, was delighted by the conversation we hosted and the colleagues we invited. McClay’s new book, Land...

Stay safe. Stay at home. And, the most important thing: stay connected and inspired.” Those parting words from an online post by the conductor of the LA Philharmonic, Gustavo Dudamel—which got me thinking about the sources of inspiration we might draw upon, at this peculiar time. For Dudamel, his inspiration comes from making beautiful music. And,...

Rob Jackson Director, Institute for Classical Education As we continue our lives in quarantine for the foreseeable future, it seems worthwhile to reflect on how to remain productive while in relative isolation. To start with, this WSJ article provides some tips for telecommuting that might be helpful in structuring our stay-at-home workdays. Then, if you need some inspiration, there...