Alienum phaedrum torquatos nec eu, vis detraxit periculis ex, nihil expetendis in mei. Mei an pericula euripidis, hinc partem.

Today's guest contributor is Dr. Colleen Sheehan of Arizona State University. Dr. Sheehan reminds us that there is much political sense and a great deal of civic sensibility found in the novels of Jane Austen. Sheehan seems comfortable suggesting that Austen has more political insights than the vast majority of today’s pundits--if only they would...

To participate in worldly and societal affairs is an inclination common to all, but to actively engage in intellectual endeavors allows one to ease the demand of constantly creating social and political outcomes. These endeavors nurture a sort of natural reflection of oneself that is ultimately ordered for its own sake.   When one commits himself to the intellectual life, he allows...

While it’s been a while since I’ve visited an architectural masterpiece like the cathedrals of Europe, a recent reference to the construction of Solomon’s Temple brought me back to the musings of Henry Adams, in his autobiographical reflections on his (elite) education. There’s lots to be learned from Adams’s own experience of a classical education,...

As we continue to post contributions from the Institute’s network, we are pleased to highlight another of our colleagues from the University of Dallas, Dr. Gregory Roper, who points us to a great Irish poet worthy of our attention. Through the #PoetryLockdown feed of a former student, Czach Zaia, I recently learned of Eavan Boland’s passing. ...

Rob Jackson Director, Institute for Classical Education As we continue our lives in quarantine for the foreseeable future, it seems worthwhile to reflect on how to remain productive while in relative isolation. To start with, this WSJ article provides some tips for telecommuting that might be helpful in structuring our stay-at-home workdays. Then, if you need some inspiration, there...

Today we will be ‘reviewing the tape’ from the 2019 National Classical Education Symposium, where our theme was literature and the art of seminar. Dr. Bernhardt Trout, a professor of chemical engineering at MIT, joined us for that Symposium, delighting the audience with an exposition of the life and work of the great Enlightenment humanist and natural scientist,...

Thanks to my good friend, Ann Ny, I'm now scanning a news digest entitled "1440." From what I can tell, it's a pretty good survey of what's happening out there in the wider world of media. From headlines to all the major categories--politics, business, sports & entertainment, science, etc., they've got a little sample of...

As we continue to review the tape from this year’s National Classical Education Symposium, we recall that historical thinking permeates the liberal arts.  In particular, one of the scholarly panels included Carol Reynolds (Southern Methodist U.), David Mason (Colorado College), Paul Spears and Diane Vincent (Biola U.). Ranging across poetry, music, and great books of literature...