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On August 18, 1920, the 19th amendment was ratified by Congress, declaring that “the right of citizens of the United States to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” Suffragettes like Susan B. Anthony, Alice Paul, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Frances Harper, and many...

This weekend included my continued, slow-reading of Zena Hitz’s Lost in Thought: the Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life. Now the title could be off-putting if Hitz was a prima donna or one of those haughty, snobbish types. But, she is anything but. Her prose are readable and friendly, interesting and winsome. More often than...

Smarter than a 6th grader? I don’t think so. Yesterday, I witnessed my son reading a selection from John Burroughs’ The Art of Seeing Things, the 19th century American naturalist who helped popularize the U.S. conservation movement. And, I was caught off guard by the clarity and beauty of this author’s writing. But, just as...

Hilary Hahn is a classical musician, particularly specializing in violin. She is a soloist who plays music composed by Mendelssohn, Bach, Beethoven, Paganini and many more. She once stated on Violinist about classical music that, "It will be what it will be. Its composers will write what they will write. It does not need to cater...

The advancements of modern science are generally a compilation of empirical quantities and an understanding of material composition. While there are incredible scientific leaps in these two respects, it is also in a sense, incomplete. The progressive gain is matched by a progressive loss in the focus of what objectively and naturally makes living beings what...

As you may know, astronomy was recognized as one of the classical subjects that would eventually be classified under the seven liberal arts. In particular, astronomy provided the practical exploration of geometry’s theoretical speculations. One of the original “applied udallasciences,” astronomy gives the opportunity to observe geometry in action, as we measure the relative positions...

Certainly poetry at its best captures sentiments and human striving with immortal lines. From the tragic battle for Troy (Homer) to the quest to recover Paradise (Milton), poetry speaks to the epic panorama of human experience. Along the way, some shorter lyrics provide us with snippets of experience, wrapped in the sounds and imagery of...

Today's guest contributor is Dr. Paul Carrese of Arizona State University. Dr. Carrese provides us some food for thought from some insightful resources--and best wishes for weathering the current quarantine with virtue. You may have heard the adage “necessity is the mother of invention;” quite apt when everyone is adapting to a global disruption. Turns out,...

“Math is the beautiful, rich, joyful, playful, surprising, frustrating, humbling and creative art that speaks to something transcendental,” says mathematician and teacher trainer James Tanton of the Mathematical Association of America. That’s quite a list of adjectives—and not the usual suspects to describe math for many.  We featured Dr. Tanton in the most recent issue of...

Given the constant stream of empirical data obtained by our five senses, human beings are awash in data. The key, of course, is to make sense of it all. By use of the imagination, we attend, filter, order, and conceive of countless perceptual signals, every moment of every day.  The intellectual challenge, of course, is how...