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“Something happens and you take it personally and get upset; something happens, you don’t take it personally and you don’t get upset. That’s 25 years worth of therapy in a sentence.” That one liner might be worth its weight in counseling fees, and you can hear it in the middle of the interview between psychologist Dr....

Today we’re reposting an interview conducted at this year’s National Classical Education Symposium in Phoenix. Joining me for a few minutes is Dr. Karen Taliaferro, to discuss her scholarship and the story that led her to that research. From her Peace Corps experiences in Morocco and her quest for a deeper understanding of knowledge, Taliaferro research...

If you find yourself with more time to observe the natural world--taking walks and hikes at sufficient social distance--you might also be interested in some careful observations surrounding the 19th century’s most famous naturalist, Charles Darwin. From David Quammen’s NYRB review of three new books on Darwin, we discover that botany was definitely the focus of...

Today we are reposting an interview with historian Patricia Limerick, whose research and scholarship focuses on the American West. We spoke with Professor Limerick at this year’s Symposium 2020.  Limerick is a prolific award-winning author, whose scholarship is supplemented by a regular column in The Denver Post. A recognized leader within the historian’s guild, Limerick served...

Romantic poet, amateur orientalist, prolific essayist and speaker (author of “Nature,” “Self-Reliance,” and “The American Scholar,” to name a few), and a leader of the Transcendentalist movement: these are but a few of the descriptors necessary to capture the contribution of Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803-1882), on this anniversary of his death. Not a few schools have...

Recently re-reading Leon Kass, I was struck by the profoundly humane quality of his reasoning. As a trained physician, medical researcher, and ethicist, Kass has been involved with a number of deeply insightful projects (e.g., President’s Council on Bioethics) that promote a truly liberal understanding of the human experience, and I would argue that he...

David Rothman is one of those colleagues whose friendship in pursuit of the Good is a genuine grace. With his characteristic wit, verve, and style (all of a piece for a man dedicated to the arts), Rothman is an incredibly cultured man, who wears his learning lightly, even delightfully. Today I’m reposting an interview with David...

Today’s video-lecture comes to us by way of Furman University, where Dr. Benjamin Storey serves as associate professor of politics and international affairs, while also co-directing the Tocqueville Program with its mission of “seeking the truth about the moral and philosophic questions at the heart of political life” through a variety of extra-curricular activities.   In the...

“There is a magic made by melody,” say Elizabeth Bishop, and I imagine that such magic is especially potent on Mondays, as we face the workweek and make plans to perform meaningful work—for ourselves and those we care for. A little poetic soundtrack for this week’s road-trip, so to speak.  As I understand it, the poets help us to rediscover the meaning that is “there before us; there before we...

As we approach the weekend and continue to reflect on our cultural moment, it seems fitting to reconsider one of America's First Principles: free speech. Rather than provide a disquisition, I'm going to refer to the legal resource website, Justia, with its page on "Freedom of Expression: The Philosophical Basis," where we read the following: "Other...