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(NOTE: the following post was provided by our colleague and friend, Dr. David Rothman, who is one of the most energetic supporters of K-12 classical education in the country--and a remarkable poet, to boot!)  A few weeks ago my old friend, the gifted poet, potato farmer, and five-time San Miguel County Commissioner Art Goodtimes approached me to write a...

While it may be considered uncouth to bring up politics and religion at the family reunion, there are strong reasons to believe that our political regime benefits from the presence of active religious communities.   As the First Amendment to our Constitution details, citizens of this nation are granted the freedoms of religious expression, speech and the...

Note: Today's guest contributor is Andrew J. Zwerneman, the president and co-founder of Cana Academy and the author of the forthcoming book, History: Forgotten and Remembered, to be released in September, 2020. As a society we are increasingly divided—from each other and from our past. However, because a classical, liberal education is deeply historical, it is well...

Note: The following post is from our guest contributor Derek Anderson, headmaster of Ridgeview Classical in Fort Collins, Colorado. In addition to leading the school, Mr. Anderson studies moral and political philosophy alongside of intellectual history. He is a proponent of the liberal arts curriculum, having taught students history, philosophy, literature and rhetoric.   As a teacher and later as a headmaster, I have frequently lamented how schooling in America so often...

NOTE: The following post is from our good colleague, Dr. David Rothman, an accomplished scholar and poet, who continues to produce works of wonder and humor under the inspiration of the Muse. My title comes from the title of an enigmatic late poem by Richard Hugo (1923-’82), a title also used for his posthumously published Collected Poems (1984). The phrase has always...

“Math is the beautiful, rich, joyful, playful, surprising, frustrating, humbling and creative art that speaks to something transcendental,” says mathematician and teacher trainer James Tanton of the Mathematical Association of America. That’s quite a list of adjectives—and not the usual suspects to describe math for many.  We featured Dr. Tanton in the most recent issue of...

As a society we are increasingly divided—from each other and from our past. However, because a classical, liberal education is deeply historical, it is well suited to help bridge that widening gulf and to be a source of cultural renewal. It accomplishes this through the formal study of history and by developing a historical habit...

While it may be considered uncouth to bring up politics and religion at the family reunion, there are strong reasons to believe that our political regime benefits from the presence of active religious communities.   As the First Amendment to our Constitution details, citizens of this nation are granted the freedoms of religious expression, speech and the...

“Math is the beautiful, rich, joyful, playful, surprising, frustrating, humbling and creative art that speaks to something transcendental,” says mathematician and teacher trainer James Tanton of the Mathematical Association of America. That’s quite a list of adjectives—and not the usual suspects to describe math for many.  We featured Dr. Tanton in the most recent issue of...

Late this spring I turned on my webcam to teach students who had come to Furman University to live and study together in an Engaged Living Program called “Politics and the Human Soul.”  This particularly tight cohort—who typically met up before class and proceeded en masse to the seminar room—was now scattered all over the...