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Note: Today's guest contributor is Andrew J. Zwerneman, the president and co-founder of Cana Academy and the author of the forthcoming book, History: Forgotten and Remembered, to be released in September, 2020. As a society we are increasingly divided—from each other and from our past. However, because a classical, liberal education is deeply historical, it is well...

Today’s video-lecture is from this year’s National Classical Education Symposium. Our conference theme, “The Historian’s Craft,” provided ample room for both historians and other subject matter experts, who could speak to the ways in which history pertains to other disciplines.  From Dr. Owen Anderson’s lecture, we learn that another discipline, philosophy, affects the ways in which we...

NOTE: The following post is from our good colleague, Dr. David Rothman, an accomplished scholar and poet, who continues to produce works of wonder and humor under the inspiration of the Muse. My title comes from the title of an enigmatic late poem by Richard Hugo (1923-’82), a title also used for his posthumously published Collected Poems (1984). The phrase has always...

As a society we are increasingly divided—from each other and from our past. However, because a classical, liberal education is deeply historical, it is well suited to help bridge that widening gulf and to be a source of cultural renewal. It accomplishes this through the formal study of history and by developing a historical habit...

This past week, I heard Kenneth L. Woodward interviewed on his 2016 book, Getting Religion: Faith, Culture, and Politics from the Age of Eisenhower to the Era of Obama (Penguin Random House). I was intrigued by Woodward’s vast experience as the former religion editor of Newsweek, where he went from observations in Omaha to visiting...

The rhythms of weeks, months, and years provide us the opportunities to reflect on temporal goals and plans, while the death of those we revere prompts us to reflect on life’s ultimate ends.   As it turns out, today coincides with the conclusion of the workweek and the end of the month. And, this week we are...

While it’s been a while since I’ve visited an architectural masterpiece like the cathedrals of Europe, a recent reference to the construction of Solomon’s Temple brought me back to the musings of Henry Adams, in his autobiographical reflections on his (elite) education. There’s lots to be learned from Adams’s own experience of a classical education,...

As we continue to review the tape from this year’s National Classical Education Symposium, we recall that historical thinking permeates the liberal arts.  In particular, one of the scholarly panels included Carol Reynolds (Southern Methodist U.), David Mason (Colorado College), Paul Spears and Diane Vincent (Biola U.). Ranging across poetry, music, and great books of literature...

Rob Jackson Director, Institute for Classical Education One month ago, we gathered in Phoenix for the 2nd annual National Classical Education Symposium, where we explored “The Historian’s Craft and the Art of Teaching History.” One of our informants, Dr. Wilfred McClay, was delighted by the conversation we hosted and the colleagues we invited. McClay’s new book, Land...

Today we are reposting an interview with historian Patricia Limerick, whose research and scholarship focuses on the American West. We spoke with Professor Limerick at this year’s Symposium 2020.  Limerick is a prolific award-winning author, whose scholarship is supplemented by a regular column in The Denver Post. A recognized leader within the historian’s guild, Limerick served...