Alienum phaedrum torquatos nec eu, vis detraxit periculis ex, nihil expetendis in mei. Mei an pericula euripidis, hinc partem.

What is the difference between history and memory?   As the late great Bernard Bailyn said, through history, we work on the past, We reach back and put past events together. And in doing so we learn about ourselves precisely by observing those who came before us.  Through memory, we allow the past to work on us. We receive our predecessors...

Note: The following entry is from Dr. Owen Anderson (Arizona State University), a Fellow of the Institute for Classical Education In my lasts posts we talked about the move from pre-skeptic to skeptic to post-skeptic.  We underscored the purpose of the Academy as the pursuit of knowledge starting with basic things.  Now we need to consider...

Today we wanted to revisit a selection from a previous issue of Virtue. In an interview with Dr. James Tanton, Institute Director Robert Jackson Ph.D delves into to the joys of teaching mathematics.   For many years my colleagues and I would stay after school to host an open house, discussing aspects of classical education with those...

For those of our colleagues who are influenced and informed by a religious tradition, there is much to be explored in the coming weeks as the holidays unfold. In particular, the Advent season provides a rich reminder of the hope, peace, love, and joy that are essential to the pursuit of the Christian religion. Throughout the ages, millions have found comfort and consolation in...

What is the difference between history and memory?   As the late great Bernard Bailyn said, through history, we work on the past, We reach back and put past events together. And in doing so we learn about ourselves precisely by observing those who came before us.  Through memory, we allow the past to work on us. We receive our predecessors...

Note: The following entry is from Dr. Owen Anderson (Arizona State University), a Fellow of the Institute for Classical Education In my lasts posts we talked about the move from pre-skeptic to skeptic to post-skeptic.  We underscored the purpose of the Academy as the pursuit of knowledge starting with basic things.  Now we need to consider...

A recent article on The Verge describes how a college student recently used an autoregressive language model and deep-learning to produce texts that appear to have been composed by a human. Out of 26,000 viewers of the blog only one was able to identify it as a mechanical algorithm, based on a perceived lack of substance.    One Senatorial committee...

Note: The following blog entry comes to us from our colleague and friend, Betsy K. Brown, who teaches and chairs the humanities program at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, Arizona. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, with a focus on creative nonfiction, Betsy loves to share the goodness of words...

For more than 40 years, Louise Glück has been publishing poetry that pierces through life’s quotidian details into deeper veins of meaning. Her themes brood upon loneliness, divorce, and death, leaving little respite from the darker features of existence. Yet, there is in her depiction of nature a sense of the doubleness of life: its goodness alongside its fading temporality.  In one of her five-stanza narratives, entitled “Averno,” Glück scans the horizon...

(NOTE: This entry was composed by Nikhil Jandhyala, an intern with the Institute and an alumnus of Anthem Preparatory Academy.)   Mathematics can be a strenuous study for many. A 2018 Pew Research poll shows that students do not pursue mathematics in college due to the difficulty of the subject. Perhaps the difficulty comes from the delivery of the subject: the way math is taught.  Jake Tawney, a veteran math teacher and teacher...