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Smarter than a 6th grader? I don’t think so. Yesterday, I witnessed my son reading a selection from John Burroughs’ The Art of Seeing Things, the 19th century American naturalist who helped popularize the U.S. conservation movement. And, I was caught off guard by the clarity and beauty of this author’s writing. But, just as...

“Math is the beautiful, rich, joyful, playful, surprising, frustrating, humbling and creative art that speaks to something transcendental,” says mathematician and teacher trainer James Tanton of the Mathematical Association of America. That’s quite a list of adjectives—and not the usual suspects to describe math for many.  We featured Dr. Tanton in the most recent issue of...

Smarter than a 6th grader? I don’t think so. Yesterday, I witnessed my son reading a selection from John Burroughs’ The Art of Seeing Things, the 19th century American naturalist who helped popularize the U.S. conservation movement. And, I was caught off guard by the clarity and beauty of this author’s writing. But, just as...

“Math is the beautiful, rich, joyful, playful, surprising, frustrating, humbling and creative art that speaks to something transcendental,” says mathematician and teacher trainer James Tanton of the Mathematical Association of America. That’s quite a list of adjectives—and not the usual suspects to describe math for many.  We featured Dr. Tanton in the most recent issue of...

Given the constant stream of empirical data obtained by our five senses, human beings are awash in data. The key, of course, is to make sense of it all. By use of the imagination, we attend, filter, order, and conceive of countless perceptual signals, every moment of every day.  The intellectual challenge, of course, is how...

With her usual style and wit, poet Marianne Moore explains why “Poetry” can be such a perfectly contemptuous form. After all, it can be nearly impenetrable, often paradoxical, and seemingly condescending to the uninitiated.  Yet, in spite of poetry’s sometimes inscrutable ways, Moore acknowledges its clarifying role in our collective consciousness--i.e., the best phrases and most...

With her usual style and wit, poet Marianne Moore explains why “Poetry” can be such a perfectly contemptuous form. After all, it can be nearly impenetrable, often paradoxical, and seemingly condescending to the uninitiated.  Yet, in spite of poetry’s sometimes inscrutable ways, Moore acknowledges its clarifying role in our collective consciousness--i.e., the best phrases and most...