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Note: this contribution is written by Jenna Storey, an accomplished scholar and a friend to the Institute. She is an Assistant Professor in Politics and International Affairs at Furman University and also Executive Director of the Tocqueville Program at Furman. She has written for many publications, including The Boston Globe, The New Atlantis, The Weekly...

This weekend included my continued, slow-reading of Zena Hitz’s Lost in Thought: the Hidden Pleasures of an Intellectual Life. Now the title could be off-putting if Hitz was a prima donna or one of those haughty, snobbish types. But, she is anything but. Her prose are readable and friendly, interesting and winsome. More often than...

The rhythms of weeks, months, and years provide us the opportunities to reflect on temporal goals and plans, while the death of those we revere prompts us to reflect on life’s ultimate ends.   As it turns out, today coincides with the conclusion of the workweek and the end of the month. And, this week we are...

The following entry is from Dr. Owen Anderson (Arizona State University), a Fellow of the Institute for Classical Education.  I am starting a series on the Academy. We need to assess the state of the Academy and the challenges it faces. This includes questions about its purpose and how it achieves that purpose. It can be...