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I began working in New York City in January 2001, teaching courses in English, literature, poetry, and philosophy of education. It was my second academic position after graduate school, and I was delighted to be joining the faculty of a small liberal arts college in the heart of Manhattan.   But, within the year, the entire world was to be shaken by an existential threat...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

Today’s video-lecture is from this year’s National Classical Education Symposium. Our conference theme, “The Historian’s Craft,” provided ample room for both historians and other subject matter experts, who could speak to the ways in which history pertains to other disciplines.  From Dr. Owen Anderson’s lecture, we learn that another discipline, philosophy, affects the ways in which we...

The rhythms of weeks, months, and years provide us the opportunities to reflect on temporal goals and plans, while the death of those we revere prompts us to reflect on life’s ultimate ends.   As it turns out, today coincides with the conclusion of the workweek and the end of the month. And, this week we are...

The following entry is from Dr. Owen Anderson (Arizona State University), a Fellow of the Institute for Classical Education.  I am starting a series on the Academy. We need to assess the state of the Academy and the challenges it faces. This includes questions about its purpose and how it achieves that purpose. It can be...

Today’s video-lecture is from this year’s National Classical Education Symposium. Our conference theme, “The Historian’s Craft,” provided ample room for both historians and other subject matter experts, who could speak to the ways in which history pertains to other disciplines.  From Dr. Owen Anderson’s lecture, we learn that another discipline, philosophy, affects the ways in which we...

Today’s video-lecture comes from the 2nd Annual National Classical Education Symposium, where we heard from Dr. Joshua Kinlaw, assistant professor of history at The King’s College. In this lecture, Dr. Kinlaw explores some of the commonalities among philosophers and theologians from the ancient period, with special emphasis on Seneca and Augustine, one of the great...