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Note: The following entry is from Dr. Owen Anderson (Arizona State University), a Fellow of the Institute for Classical Education In my previous post I discussed the need for common ground.  If there is no common ground then we cannot come to agreement.  Common ground begins with reason as that by which we understand.  The Academy...

Note: The following blog entry comes to us from our colleague and friend, Betsy K. Brown, who teaches and chairs the humanities program at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, Arizona. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, with a focus on creative nonfiction, Betsy loves to share the goodness of words...

[Note: The following post is from our guest contributor Mr. Derek Anderson, headmaster of Ridgeview Classical in Fort Collins, Colorado. In addition to leading the school, Mr. Anderson remains an avid student of moral and political philosophy, alongside of intellectual history. His defense of the liberal arts curriculum is based upon his many years of having taught students history, philosophy, literature, and rhetoric.] Whether...

We hear a lot of wistful talk about civility these days, but precious few examples of it in action. Maybe we need to look to the past, to find enduring standards against which we can begin to reckon our own deficiencies. I came across an excellent one the other day, and I thought it would...

The study of history today suffers from a great denial. Too often, past events of exploitation are isolated from their context and then retold collectively as the sum of history. Consequently, the proper study of the past is forgotten and Western culture neglected. To regain our historical bearings, this observation needs to be restored: Our civilization was...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

I began working in New York City in January 2001, teaching courses in English, literature, poetry, and philosophy of education. It was my second academic position after graduate school, and I was delighted to be joining the faculty of a small liberal arts college in the heart of Manhattan.   But, within the year, the entire world was to be shaken by an existential threat...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

Today’s video-lecture is from this year’s National Classical Education Symposium. Our conference theme, “The Historian’s Craft,” provided ample room for both historians and other subject matter experts, who could speak to the ways in which history pertains to other disciplines.  From Dr. Owen Anderson’s lecture, we learn that another discipline, philosophy, affects the ways in which we...

The rhythms of weeks, months, and years provide us the opportunities to reflect on temporal goals and plans, while the death of those we revere prompts us to reflect on life’s ultimate ends.   As it turns out, today coincides with the conclusion of the workweek and the end of the month. And, this week we are...