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I recently revisited T. S. Eliot’s ​“Little Gidding”​and found it to be an encouragement for our times, uncertain as they are for the uncertain relationship we have with our past. Perhaps this meditation will offer some light and hope. Note this remarkable line, which, on the surface, is fraught with the highest human stakes: A people without...

[Note: Benjamin V. Beier, Ph. D. is an Associate Professor of Education at Hillsdale College. He has published articles on Shakespeare, Thomas More, and related topics, and is currently co-authoring a book on Aristotelian logic.]  “Does classical education perpetuate racism, Ms. Hugh?” This question may strike the supporters of classical education as silly, but after a...

Reflecting upon yesterday’s national holiday, an occasion for us to commemorate the service and self-sacrifice of our veterans, I was struck by the ways in which our arts—sculpture, poetry and literature, painting, etc.—help us to capture the sentiments of society on such a day.  As you probably know, Veterans’ Day was formally initiated on the anniversary...

[Note: Benjamin V. Beier, Ph. D. is an Associate Professor of Education at Hillsdale College. He has published articles on Shakespeare, Thomas More, and related topics, and is currently co-authoring a book on Aristotelian logic.]  “Does classical education perpetuate racism, Ms. Hugh?” This question may strike the supporters of classical education as silly, but after a...

Note: The following blog entry comes to us from our colleague and friend, Betsy K. Brown, who teaches and chairs the humanities program at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, Arizona. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, with a focus on creative nonfiction, Betsy loves to share the goodness of words...

For more than 40 years, Louise Glück has been publishing poetry that pierces through life’s quotidian details into deeper veins of meaning. Her themes brood upon loneliness, divorce, and death, leaving little respite from the darker features of existence. Yet, there is in her depiction of nature a sense of the doubleness of life: its goodness alongside its fading temporality.  In one of her five-stanza narratives, entitled “Averno,” Glück scans the horizon...

Taking some time off this past week, I slipped into a used bookstore with a half-price sale. Sounds vintage or even classic, right? In any case, such a place with such a sale is a nearly irresistible invitation to imbibe for this bookaholic.   Having browsed the shelves of various categories, I came upon a 1961 copy...

This past week, I heard Kenneth L. Woodward interviewed on his 2016 book, Getting Religion: Faith, Culture, and Politics from the Age of Eisenhower to the Era of Obama (Penguin Random House). I was intrigued by Woodward’s vast experience as the former religion editor of Newsweek, where he went from observations in Omaha to visiting...

With her usual style and wit, poet Marianne Moore explains why “Poetry” can be such a perfectly contemptuous form. After all, it can be nearly impenetrable, often paradoxical, and seemingly condescending to the uninitiated.  Yet, in spite of poetry’s sometimes inscrutable ways, Moore acknowledges its clarifying role in our collective consciousness--i.e., the best phrases and most...