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Reflecting upon yesterday’s national holiday, an occasion for us to commemorate the service and self-sacrifice of our veterans, I was struck by the ways in which our arts—sculpture, poetry and literature, painting, etc.—help us to capture the sentiments of society on such a day.  As you probably know, Veterans’ Day was formally initiated on the anniversary...

Note: The following blog entry comes to us from our colleague and friend, Betsy K. Brown, who teaches and chairs the humanities program at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, Arizona. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, with a focus on creative nonfiction, Betsy loves to share the goodness of words...

Note: The following blog entry comes to us from our colleague and friend, Betsy K. Brown, who teaches and chairs the humanities program at Cicero Preparatory Academy in Scottsdale, Arizona. A graduate of Seattle Pacific University’s MFA in Creative Writing program, with a focus on creative nonfiction, Betsy loves to share the goodness of words...

For more than 40 years, Louise Glück has been publishing poetry that pierces through life’s quotidian details into deeper veins of meaning. Her themes brood upon loneliness, divorce, and death, leaving little respite from the darker features of existence. Yet, there is in her depiction of nature a sense of the doubleness of life: its goodness alongside its fading temporality.  In one of her five-stanza narratives, entitled “Averno,” Glück scans the horizon...

As we continue to post contributions from the Institute’s network, we are pleased to highlight another of our colleagues from the University of Dallas, Dr. Gregory Roper, who points us to a great Irish poet worthy of our attention. Make sure to read his latest piece, Arguing Agreeably, in the Institute's Virtue 6 - Pedagogy...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

Note: Today's guest contributor is Andrew J. Zwerneman, the president and co-founder of Cana Academy and the author of the forthcoming book, History: Forgotten and Remembered, to be released in September, 2020. As a society we are increasingly divided—from each other and from our past. However, because a classical, liberal education is deeply historical, it is well...

I began working in New York City in January 2001, teaching courses in English, literature, poetry, and philosophy of education. It was my second academic position after graduate school, and I was delighted to be joining the faculty of a small liberal arts college in the heart of Manhattan.   But, within the year, the entire world was to be shaken by an existential threat...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

Certainly we find ourselves in trying times, between a global pandemic, with all of its economic implications, and the social unrest that simmers and then boils over onto the streets of American cities. It’s tough out there, and it’s hard to get our bearings in the 24/7 news cycle with its constant stream of information and conflicting reports.  Meanwhile, parents face the strain of determining their children’s future, as...