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Note: Today's guest contributor is Andrew J. Zwerneman, the president and co-founder of Cana Academy and the author of the forthcoming book, History: Forgotten and Remembered, to be released in September, 2020. As a society we are increasingly divided—from each other and from our past. However, because a classical, liberal education is deeply historical, it is well...

I began working in New York City in January 2001, teaching courses in English, literature, poetry, and philosophy of education. It was my second academic position after graduate school, and I was delighted to be joining the faculty of a small liberal arts college in the heart of Manhattan.   But, within the year, the entire world was to be shaken by an existential threat...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

Certainly we find ourselves in trying times, between a global pandemic, with all of its economic implications, and the social unrest that simmers and then boils over onto the streets of American cities. It’s tough out there, and it’s hard to get our bearings in the 24/7 news cycle with its constant stream of information and conflicting reports.  Meanwhile, parents face the strain of determining their children’s future, as...

NOTE: The following post is from our good colleague, Dr. David Rothman, an accomplished scholar and poet, who continues to produce works of wonder and humor under the inspiration of the Muse. My title comes from the title of an enigmatic late poem by Richard Hugo (1923-’82), a title also used for his posthumously published Collected Poems (1984). The phrase has always...

As a society we are increasingly divided—from each other and from our past. However, because a classical, liberal education is deeply historical, it is well suited to help bridge that widening gulf and to be a source of cultural renewal. It accomplishes this through the formal study of history and by developing a historical habit...

Taking some time off this past week, I slipped into a used bookstore with a half-price sale. Sounds vintage or even classic, right? In any case, such a place with such a sale is a nearly irresistible invitation to imbibe for this bookaholic.   Having browsed the shelves of various categories, I came upon a 1961 copy...

Certainly poetry at its best captures sentiments and human striving with immortal lines. From the tragic battle for Troy (Homer) to the quest to recover Paradise (Milton), poetry speaks to the epic panorama of human experience. Along the way, some shorter lyrics provide us with snippets of experience, wrapped in the sounds and imagery of...

As we continue to post contributions from the Institute’s network, we are pleased to highlight another of our colleagues from the University of Dallas, Dr. Gregory Roper, who points us to a great Irish poet worthy of our attention. Through the #PoetryLockdown feed of a former student, Czach Zaia, I recently learned of Eavan Boland’s passing. ...