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Anyone well-versed on the Roman Catholic Church knows that, like every human endeavor, its history is marred by acts of hubris. In the 1630’s, one of the Church’s most flawed judgments may have been the decision to put Galileo Galilei, arguably the father of modern science, under house arrest following an Inquisition. That incident is spotlighted...

(NOTE: the following post was provided by our colleague and friend, Dr. David Rothman, who is one of the most energetic supporters of K-12 classical education in the country--and a remarkable poet, to boot!)  A few weeks ago my old friend, the gifted poet, potato farmer, and five-time San Miguel County Commissioner Art Goodtimes approached me to write a...

The advancements of modern science are generally a compilation of empirical quantities and an understanding of material composition. While there are incredible scientific leaps in these two respects, it is also in a sense, incomplete. The progressive gain is matched by a progressive loss in the focus of what objectively and naturally makes living beings what...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

NOTE: Today’s blog entry is from our guest contributor, Dr. Michael Ivins, whose study of great books and subsequent research surrounding the philosophy of Aristotle have equipped him with a quick eye for the philosophical implications of modern science. Dr. Ivins taught for five years at St. Vincent College (PA) and now teaches at Scottsdale...

The advancements of modern science are generally a compilation of empirical quantities and an understanding of material composition. While there are incredible scientific leaps in these two respects, it is also in a sense, incomplete. The progressive gain is matched by a progressive loss in the focus of what objectively and naturally makes living beings what...

Midweek it’s always nice to peek at where the sciences are growing: pointing us to newly discovered phenomena, describing innovative tools of exploration, and developing theories to explain how the parts fit into the whole. Such is the ongoing, perpetual work of the sciences, an integral part of any coherent classical education. As such, it’s good...

Today we will be ‘reviewing the tape’ from the 2019 National Classical Education Symposium, where our theme was literature and the art of seminar. Dr. Bernhardt Trout, a professor of chemical engineering at MIT, joined us for that Symposium, delighting the audience with an exposition of the life and work of the great Enlightenment humanist and natural scientist,...

Today we will be ‘reviewing the tape’ from the 2019 National Classical Education Symposium, where our theme was literature and the art of seminar. Dr. Bernhardt Trout, a professor of chemical engineering at MIT, joined us for that Symposium, delighting the audience with an exposition of the life and work of the great Enlightenment humanist and natural scientist,...

Midweek it’s always nice to peek at where the sciences are growing: pointing us to newly discovered phenomena, describing innovative tools of exploration, and developing theories to explain how the parts fit into the whole. Such is the ongoing, perpetual work of the sciences, an integral part of any coherent classical education. As such, it’s good...