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Today’s post is from our long-time collaborator, Dr. Matthew Post of the University of Dallas, who offers us some thoughts on Brian Greene and his distinctions between facts and values.  In a recent TIME article, Brian Greene, director of Columbia’s center for theoretical physics, asserts that there is no moral order, no purpose to the universe, and...

As you may know, astronomy was recognized as one of the classical subjects that would eventually be classified under the seven liberal arts. In particular, astronomy provided the practical exploration of geometry’s theoretical speculations. One of the original “applied udallasciences,” astronomy gives the opportunity to observe geometry in action, as we measure the relative positions...

Today we are pleased to post the second half of Dr. Matt Post’s reflections on neuroscience and the nature of mind (see May 4’s post for the first half). His thoughts were prompted by an article by Sam Kean in Slate, entitled “Phineas Gage, Neuroscience’s Most Famous Patient.”  I am surprised by Kean’s conclusion: “Another, deeper...

On this first day of May, we are introducing a new (and improved) feature of our blog: guest contributors from the Institute’s network of Fellows, Advisors, and Friends. To start off, we are pleased to introduce our long-time collaborator, Dr. Matthew Post of the University of Dallas, who offers us some thoughts on the relationship...