Issue 02 | Science

Character, the Project of Life

This summer, Robert Jackson interviewed New York Times best-selling author of “Grit” and University of Pennsylvania professor, Angela Duckworth, concerning her research on character. She found one common characteristic among high achievers—from prima ballerinas to grand chess masters to mathematicians: “That’s what makes grit so interesting: it seems to be a hallmark of high achievers across very different domains.” In a friendly conversation, Robert also discovered that she gets her bearings from classical philosophy—and being the parent of two teenage girls. She even admits that there’s more to character than grit. (See page 4 for the inside scoop with Dr. Duckworth.)

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